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Dragon castle

dragon castle

Mai Rezension/Kritik Spiel: Dragon Castle. [email protected] Euer Magazin zum Thema Brettspiele und Kartenspiele. Regelmässig. Mai Rezension/Kritik Spiel: Dragon Castle. [email protected] Euer Magazin zum Thema Brettspiele und Kartenspiele. Regelmässig. März Dragon Castle Cover. Cover / Foto: Brettspielpoesie. Man muss das Rad nicht immer neu erfinden. Umso mehr Spiele am Markt existieren. If it were not for my taking charge, nothing would probably ever get done around here". Yes, this is a fairy Beste Spielothek in Schernsdorf finden, but there were certain events and characters that I found hard to believe. Dragon castle proof is in the pudding. Never mind that as the story continues Bruchac manages to show instances of Rashko's parents and older brother showing great savvy while looking like they are dumb as a trio of stumps. It does have potential. To ask other readers questions about Dragon Castleplease sign Sumo Kitty slot - spil Sumo Kitty Slots gratis online. So much that I didn't want to give it back to the library because I really wanted to read it again. The other characters are likable as well and also a lot of fun. Intertwined throughout Rashko's tale is the story of Pavol, another young prince who lived long before. Dragon castle was created for people who admire action askgamblers top 10 casinos humor.

Dragon castle -

Erfahrene Spieler können auch mehrere dieser Karten in einer Partie verwenden. Fügt man diese nämlich zu einer Gruppe zusammen, darf man nicht nur - wie sonst üblich - einen Schrein setzen, sondern gleich zwei. Neuheiten von NSV. Ihr Warenkorb ist leer. Enable All Save Settings. Auf umgedrehten Steine dürfen ebenfalls Steine platziert werden, die maximale Stapelhöhe beträgt drei Steine. Besten Dank für Ihre Rückmeldung.

He loves to spar, throw parties, and has complete trust in Rashko. The parents don't fret over the little things and they are wise, kind, and justly rulers even if they don't look like it.

They are not in the book a lot so there's not much to say about them but Rashko mentions them a lot. The other characters are likable as well and also a lot of fun.

Georgi is a wise man who notices the danger of the baron and assists Rashko in many ways that he can. I'm not sure if they are the same people but the book gives a few hints that they are so maybe.

The dogs, Ucta and Odvaha are pretty cool as well. Aside from the characters the story is pretty good too. An evil baron and his daughter arrive at the castle when the King and Queen are gone.

But since Prince Paulek is too enchanted by the baron's daughter's beauty, it's up to Prince Rashko to stop the evil baron's plan and save the castle.

While I was reading the beginning I was shouting "Brilliant! This is a perfect setup! So after I gave this series nothing but complements you are probably wondering why I didn't rate it a 5.

Well, there are some problems I had with the book. One is the setting. It's not that it's bad, it's just a little confusing. It seems like a Slovakian medieval fantasy which it is suppose to be but then it adds dragons, magic, and I'm here thinking Ok, cool.

I can deal with it. But then the book adds things like talking animals, Faerie Folk, and the possibility of vampires.

I can understand dragons and magic but what about the talking animals? And why is Rashko the only one able to communicate with his dogs?

Why is he able to heal the plants when they were cut? Is it because of the faerie blood that his mother supposedly has?

So he is able to somehow heal the trees, befriend animals, and use magic. What makes him more special than his older brother Paulek? What about the Faerie Folk and the vampires?

Are there any other creatures here? What is the setting of this fantasy world? The other problem is the villain. I'm sorry, but this villain is so bland and forgettable, Granted, I've read worse not to mention we don't see a lot of him in the book.

In the beginning he just destroys a kingdom and takes over or has his men watch over the land. Then I think this is how it goes he lives for a long time as several people, one being Baron Temny, who is pretty nasty but his goal or his reason for taking over the kingdom are not mentioned.

I understand his later attempt with a motive for revenge but what's the Dark Lord's deal? Seriously, the only reason I remember his name because the villain in Harry Potter is also called the Dark Lord.

Where did he come from? What are his goals? How did he become evil? Is he doing his evil deeds just to be evil? Did he attack other lands?

When he was defeated, what did he do this whole time? Does he want wealth or power? Does he have some sort of grudge? The final issue I have is the ending.

It's rushed and a lot of things are just thrown in. For example, based on the title and summary we can assume that the secret is that there is a dragon in the castle, which is cool, but here's the thing: The only thing I know about the dragon is that he has riches, every time you cut off his head a new one grows, he's violent, and he isn't very smart.

What's so special about this dragon aside from his riches? Another thing that is added are the two assassin princesses disguised as juggles.

As soon as they ally themselves with the two princes I was thinking "No! You can't do this to me! The two warrior princesses are love interests for the two princes.

It wouldn't be a big deal except that the love is insta-love. The princes have known them for about a few minutes and already the book makes it obvious that the couples are set.

In the last chapter it seems like Pavol will have his soul come back and guide his descendants. Since his steed will become two dogs he will have "two Pavols" and his wife will have "two princesses".

This is fine except it rises a couple of questions. If both Paulek and Rashko are their ancestor Pavol, why does Rashko seem special?

Why does the book only follow him? Why does Rashko have the ability to heal the forest, use magic, and talk to animals mostly just to their dogs?

Why do the dogs, Ucta and Odvaha, seem especially close to Rashko? How come the book doesn't follow Paulek too? Not just those questions.

In the book there is a chapter where Pavol's future half-faerie wife Karoline gives him a dragon bracelet. Then we don't see her again until around the end where Pavol announces her as his future wife.

Ok, but when did they meet again? How did they find each other? Did they even have any conversations before they decided to get married?

When they first meet he has to save her. Karoline is so bland. The only thing I know for sure about her is that she is half-faerie. We don't see her much.

The ending is so. There are a couple of fights dealing with magic, a few clashing swords, and then Rashko calls the dragon and it eats all the bad guys.

Yeah, that's how it ends and then everybody acts like nothing happened. The parents return from the party, the servants clean up the mess, the princesses are cleaned up, and the dragon goes back to where he belongs.

Not the climax I was hoping for but at least the dragon did something. Besides those three issues I had the setting, the villain, the ending I liked this book and the stuff that is good is just too good to give it a 1 or a 2.

But boooooook, you were so close! Overall, I really do like it. I just have a couple of issues with it. Oct 22, Ms.

Albert rated it really liked it Shelves: Prince Rashko, who tells the story, knows that his parents, the king and queen, along with his brother, Paulek, who is in line to be king, aren't the smartest people.

His parents disppear just before evil Baron Temny shows up with his forces and camps outside the castle walls. Paulek is immediately smitten with his daughter and literally falls under her spell.

He invites the Baron and his entourage inside the castle walls as guests. Rashko feels that his brother has invited the enemy in and give Prince Rashko, who tells the story, knows that his parents, the king and queen, along with his brother, Paulek, who is in line to be king, aren't the smartest people.

Rashko feels that his brother has invited the enemy in and given away their peaceful kingdom. Does Paulek follow after his father, though?

Does he have a plan of his own? When all seems lost, the secret, sleeping deep within the mysterious, magical castle, wakes up and defends the castle.

In the end, have the tables been turned on Rashko? The author goes back to his own Slovakian heritage. There is a glossary of Slovak terms used in the story at the back of the book.

This is a story that seems straight forward at first, but it twists and transforms in surprising and delightful ways. May 12, Kerri Simpson rated it liked it.

It definitely grabbed my attention on the shelf. That being said I couldn't find a connection to the characters.

That is every bit as important as the story being told. You need me to scream and want to throw the book at something because im in an emotional state over the characters.

I have never actually thrown my books at anything. It does have potential. Some things could have been fleshed out better and more detail. Someone else may enjoy the book more.

This one just will not be added amon It definitely grabbed my attention on the shelf. This one just will not be added among my favorites. Oct 22, Megan rated it liked it Shelves: Joseph Bruchac explores his Slovakian roots in this juvenile fantasy fiction.

Young Prince Rashko has grown up in a castle with a dragon and a fortune. There are stories about how his ancestor discovered the fortune, the dragon, and built the castle in one day.

When his parents are called away, the castle is surrounded by an enemy army. Rashko must discover secrets about the castle's history to save it.

Sep 23, Alli Trenkamp rated it it was ok Shelves: Good book overall, this book would be good for the middle school age.

I did like the ending though. I wouldn't personally use this book in my classroom but it is a great fantasy book for middle school aged kids to read!

Aug 17, Lily rated it really liked it. An interesting story about a prince who is more intelligent than the rest of his family. His castle is under siege and his parents are missing.

He has two giant wolf-dogs that he can talk with. A simple plot with lots of action, magic and revelation. Feb 09, Raygina rated it really liked it.

There was more depth in this than I thought there would be. Apr 09, Terri rated it liked it. This is a tough one. First off, fantasy is not my favorite genre, so I think I am automatically harder to please when faced with the task of reading a fantasy.

I have, however, enjoyed books by Joseph Bruchac in the past - "Code Talker," for instance - though fantasy is not generally his genre either.

So, I started in on "Dragon Castle" with less resistance than usual. Mackin's annotation of the book reads as follows: He finally gets a chance to test the scope of his intellect when Baron Temny arrives at his family's castle with a small army while his parents are absent.

Unsurprised at the fact that his brother provides no help, Rashko is left to defend his home by himself. As the conflict becomes more intense, however, Rashko ends up requiring the help of several supporting characters to achieve victory, allowing him to realize that he may be giving those around him less credit than they deserve.

First of all, the vocabulary is way above the heads of most middle schoolers and high schoolers for that matter.

Readers will find an abundance of words like "recalcitrant" found on page where Bruchac curiously adds in parentheses, "another word to add to the list.

Consider the use of terms like "emblazoned," "aesthetic," "calamity," "obtuseness," and "interminable. Bruchac does provide a list of characters and places, as well as a Slovak glossary - but, because they come at the end of the book, readers might not find them until they have finished with the book.

In addition, the use of a somewhat unreliable, clueless narrator adds another complexity to the story.

Though the idea of an unreliable narrator has always fascinated me, and is a great discussion for the ILA classroom, it does add more challenge to the story.

The reader figures things out as the narrator does. The addition of Pavol's Legend, told in alternate chapters further complicates matters.

Based on the language and use of narration, the book might take a special reader to stick with it. And that is OK. Though the book may not have wide appeal, there is value in the availability of challenging books for middle school readers.

Dec 29, Elizabeth added it Shelves: My initial, gut reaction to this: To begin with the book is beautifully written. It has a sense of humor, a good vocabulary and an exciting plot.

Bruchac does a masterful job of working in Slovak phrases and words to add authenticity to the story. The story alternates between the story of Rashko and his ancesto My initial, gut reaction to this: The story alternates between the story of Rashko and his ancestor, Pavol.

It seems likely that at some point the two stories will meet or at the least begin to parallel each other. Bruchac obviously drew on Slovak legends and the way he weaves details into his own legends is wonderful.

Rashko is such a likable character. While he feels like he has to tolerate his family and their lack of intellect he never sounds like a jerk.

The structure of the book alternating between legend and the present and to some extent the plot reminded me a lot of The Heroes of the Valley by Jonathan Stroud.

I also saw similarities in their situation with missing parents and Baron Temny taking over, in the role of magic and the role of the castle with Tuesdays at the Castle by Jessica Day George.

Certainly middle schoolers, especially those that love fantasy and folklore, will enjoy this. But it could extend up into high school too.

Just an all around good book for most ages. Jun 25, Brandy Painter rated it really liked it Shelves: Originally posted at Random Musings of a Bibliophile.

The two words in the title were all the encouragement I needed to read Dragon Castle by Joseph Bruchac.

Where there are dragons and castles I shall go. I was taken by surprise by how greatly entertained I was in reading this.

It was the perfect mix of light and dark, peril and humor. Rashko is a bit arrogant and pompous, but no more than most kids are at the age of He makes up for these flaws by being delightfully snarky at the same time.

H Originally posted at Random Musings of a Bibliophile. He is convinced that all other members of his family are severely lacking in intelligence.

Intelligence he, of course, possesses in abundance. Why, I sometimes wonder; am I the only one in our family who ever seems to entertain a thought as anything other than a transient visitor?

Why is it that when our lord and creator Boh was handing out brains, my parents and my brother apparently got in line behind the hummingbirds?

If it were not for my taking charge, nothing would ever get properly done around here. As the story progresses Rashko begins to see his family members in new and surprising ways and learns to appreciate that their strengths are greater than he realized.

As are his weaknesses. This is what I enjoyed most about the book. Rashko's story is intertwined with the legend of his several greats grandfather Pavol.

The more the reader and Rashko learn about Pavol the more interesting Rashko's present circumstances get. The fantasy elements are well done and perfect for the reader who enjoys the lighter side of a story.

There are moments of peril, battles to be fought, evil to be overcome, but there is just enough hint of the sightly absurd to keep it from being too serious.

The dragon is ferocious and vastly entertaining simultaneously. It takes a writer with skills to do that. Dragon's Castle is a perfect read for anyone looking for a fun adventure story.

Sep 22, Kay Mcgriff rated it it was amazing Shelves: Not only can Joseph Bruchac write historical fiction, he can also rock fantasy.

Dragon Castle is now one of my go to books of classic fantasy. Bruchac intertwines two stories--those of Rashko and his legendary ancestor Pavol--that pulse with magic.

Rashko is the only one in his family that seems to have a clue--other than the servants who really keep the household going. His mother and father have ruled their kingdom with kindness and peace, but not much wisdom that Rashko can determine.

Still, w Not only can Joseph Bruchac write historical fiction, he can also rock fantasy. Still, when his parents disappear just in time for the evil Baron Temny to show up with a formidable army, he's not sure he's ready to defend the castle and kingdom.

To make matters worse, his brother Paulek quickly falls under the spell entirely magical of Temny's beautiful daughter Poteshenie.

Rashko has grown up with the tapestry that shows the story of his ancestor Pavol--who rescued the kingdom from the Dark Lord. It is said that he defeated a dragon and raised their castle, Hladka Hvorka, overnight from the mountain.

Pavol supposedly survived the Dark Lord by pretending to be Pavol the Fool, but during his reign he became known as Pavol the Just. Can Rashko live up to Pavol's legacy and rescue his kingdom from the threat of evil again?

It will take every bit of his swordplay and wit to turn away Temny. It's a good thing he doesn't have to do it alone. Help comes from unexpected places as Rashko discovers that not everything is as it seems and that there is much magic hidden underneath appearances.

I wish I had read the author's note at the end before reading the story. In it, Bruchac explains the inspiration for the story that comes from his grandparents' heritage in Slovakia.

I think I just discovered a whole new world of folklore to explore. First published on my blog at http: Oct 29, Christina rated it really liked it Shelves: Looking at the cover I expected a dangerous, sword fighting adventure.

Not until the very end. This book is a lot like a long, but clever fable. Rashko's parents have disappeared and some uninvited,evil guests have settled into their castle.

Rashko feels the burden of having to save everyone from impending doom, because his parents and brothers are incapable of recognizing, much less dealing with the danger they are facing.

As Rashko tells the story in first person, a parallel tale of his ancest Looking at the cover I expected a dangerous, sword fighting adventure.

As Rashko tells the story in first person, a parallel tale of his ancestor Pavol is also being told.

Bruchac's writing is always descriptive in a humorous way. I love how Rashko assesses his family's abilities to handle the situation: If it were not for my taking charge, nothing would probably ever get done around here".

Also, Rashko has the best curse ever "By the head of the dragon"! And his characters continually dole out proverbs which are quite amusing: Guests and fish start to stink after three days That's one of my favorites.

Yes, Bruchac is an entertaining storyteller. However, I often felt like an impatient reader, waiting for the "real" action to begin.

This story was very carefully built upon a short exploit or lesson. It wasn't until after reading the final pages, the story really stuck with me, and I fell a little bit in love with the characters and the setting.

I highly recommend reading the author notes first. There is also a cast of characters and Slovak dictionary in the back. On a sadder note,in a day where there are so many fast paced stories competing with the action and adventure of TV and video games, I can't help but wonder which children will pick this book up and appreciate it for the finely wrought tale that it is?

Sep 15, Ahmad ameen rated it it was amazing. Joseph Bruchac, the author of the book, had based his past novels on subjects such as Native American stories and environmental activities of children.

However in this case he has presented an unusual story line for a book. In over thirty years, Bruchac was able to write more than books including Dragon Castle.

He was also awarded the Knicker Award for juvenile literature by the New York library association. Dragon castle was created for people who admire action and humor.

With that said, his world features castles, swords, magic and dragons. The story has two different time lines.

Hladka Hvokra, a castle and home of a creature so frightening your shoes will run away from it, is the setting of the story of both story lines.

In the book there is a rumor that says the castle was built in one day. Rashko, a resident in the castle, is a 16 year old teenager that thinks he lives with a bunch of idiots, his family, and his servants Grace, Grace,Grace, Charity and Georgi, the butler who can break your arm with a tap of his hand.

The reason why Dragon Castle should be read goes beyond the title and cover of the book. The story takes the reader to a whole new world with a wondrous adventure.

The story captures the reader with its mystery and humor. One could not close the book until all of its secrets were unraveled, and only then will the reader be satisfied to close this fascinating book.

Sep 12, Sarah W rated it really liked it Shelves: Prince Rashko can't stop worrying. His parents are missing.

His brother Paulek doesn't believe anything is wrong and thinks Rashko needs to stop being so concerned. That's easy for Paulek to say and impossible for Rashko to do.

In his mind, Rashko has to do all the thinking for his family or at least that's the way he sees it. His parents, the king and queen, are too trusting.

They see the world simply and Rashko's older brother Paulek is Prince Rashko can't stop worrying. They see the world simply and Rashko's older brother Paulek is just like them.

Thankfully there are people with sense to help them like Georgi, the castle steward. It's Georgi who convinces Rashko to take another look at his parents room where the prince discovers an enchanted invitation lying discarded.

An invitation that directed his parents straight to faerie. The king and queen have disappeared at the worst possible time. An uninvited guest shows up at their tiny kingdom.

Baron Tenmy doesn't have a good night's rest on his mind or a welcome feast. He wants their home for himself. Rashko needs to find a way to get Paulek's attention off Tenmy's daughter and onto the danger.

Intertwined throughout Rashko's tale is the story of Pavol, another young prince who lived long before. He too fled a dangerous foe, the only survivor of his childhood home.

He has to face ridicule, challenges, dragons and more to protect his new home from the same fate as his first.

Bruchac's retelling of a Slovakian fairy tale makes for an interesting middle grade fantasy read. This is not a fast-paced action story.

Rather, reading this book is like figuring out a puzzle. Everything has a role and you have to know the pieces to understand the big picture.

Gypsies, magical dogs and knowing elders add to the tapestry of this book. Jun 25, Jo rated it it was amazing Shelves: Prince Rashko sees himself as the only person in his family with any sort of sense.

His parents and older brother are good natured, generous, peace-loving people for sure, but when it comes to defending themselves against any sort of evil, well… Thus, it comes as not much of a surprise to Prince Rashko that when the shady-looking Baron Temny and his men camp outside the castle walls, his parents are MIA lured away by a false fairy invitation , and his brother opens up the castle gates and invit Prince Rashko sees himself as the only person in his family with any sort of sense.

His parents and older brother are good natured, generous, peace-loving people for sure, but when it comes to defending themselves against any sort of evil, well… Thus, it comes as not much of a surprise to Prince Rashko that when the shady-looking Baron Temny and his men camp outside the castle walls, his parents are MIA lured away by a false fairy invitation , and his brother opens up the castle gates and invites the Baron in.

With the help of some friends, and the example of his ancestor Pavol, Rashko sets out defeat the evil that threatens his family and kingdom.

When you read a lot of fantasy, sometimes it all starts to run together. It takes something unique in the tone, story, or characters to make a book stand out.

With this book, it was the subtle humor that set it apart from the pack. Even though the situation is serious, Bruchach manages to slip in some funny dialogue and slapstick moments that convey a unique mood.

Not enough ambiguity to be dissatisfying, but enough to make the reader feel a bit clever. I found it to be perfectly relaxing, plus it put a smile on my face.

I was thinking about who I would recommend this book too…the closest books in similarity I can think of are the Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia Wrede dragons, humor.

So, fantasy fans who are looking for a bit of a lighter read might enjoy this one. May 05, Kim rated it really liked it Shelves: From August SLJ: Gr —Prince Rashko, 15, loves his parents and his older brother, Paulek, but is often vexed by their trusting natures and apparent simplemindedness.

When the king and queen disappear and sinister Baron Temny shows up at Hladka Hvorka, Rashko feels the full weight of protecting the family castle.

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